Posted by & filed under Save the Evidence.

Happy Holidays from all of us here at Woodland Cultural Centre

We hope all of you have a safe and joyous Holiday Season! Please remember that we are closed her at the Centre from Dec 21st – Jan 5th. If you’re looking for a last minute gift that is more than just another box of chocolates or a gift card, stop by our Museum and see the various gift packages we have available for sale. Larger selection of products available for purchase on site.

 

Gifts under $40 that support the “Save the Evidence” Campaign

 

Why not give a gift that has a deeper meaning and impact? All of the proceeds from our Online Store go towards the Save the Evidence Campaign. We have something for everyone, young and old. Knowing that your gift is going to help to preserve an important part of history, make both the Giver and the Receiver feel good about their presents!

Gift a Brick

The Gift a Brick initiative is a great way to share the Save the Evidence with many of your loved ones this year.

For just $5 you can sign your loved ones name on the replica brick and allow others to be a part of the Save the Evidence campaign. We encourage you to tell the story of the former Mohawk Institute Residential School, and your Gift not only saves a brick out of the 400,000 Brick project, but also helps us spread awareness about the project.

Stop into the Museum before December 20th to pick up your Brick Certificate or email us for the printable download if you donate ONLINE at CanadaHelps.

$5

 


 

Save the Evidence T-Shirts (Black or White)

One of our favourite items this year is our Save the Evidence Shirts with the Mohawk Institute Building on the front. These shirts now are available in white and black, and are a great way to spread awareness about the significance of the project! Where your support proudly and you’ll be shocked at how many people ask you “What is Save the Evidence?”

These shirts make the perfect gift for teachers, coworkers, friends and family.

Currently only available in adult sizes.

$25

 


Fatty Legs: A True Story

This book is an interesting story of an Inuit girl who wanted to learn to read. This incredible story has been wildly honoured in the Childrens’ book world. It documents the young girl’s experience at a Residential School and shares the true story of what many Indigenous children experienced during that time.

Fatty Legs made the Globe and Mail’s Ten Best Children’s Books of the Year in 2010 and was named a finalist for the Sheila A. Egoff Children’s Literature Prize, part of the BC Book Prize awards. 

This book is a grade 4+ reading level.

A great gift idea for someone younger, or even a teacher who teaches at that Grade level for their classroom.

$22


A Stranger at Home: Sequel to the Powerful Memoir Fatty Legs

The sequel to the award-winning Fatty Legs, A Stranger at Home continues the story of Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, who again works with her daughter-in-law, Christy Jordon-Fenton, to tell her tale. This part of the story tells about the young girl’s return home and the struggles of going back to her family and community after her experience at the Residential School. Her own mother does not recognize her. It’s a

A Stranger at Home book is a grade 4+ reading level.

The perfect combination with Fatty Legs.

$22


Residential School: A Children’s History

Residential Schools: With the Words and Images of Survivors, A National History EPUB honours the Survivors of residential schools.  A finalist for the Norma Fleck award, this book offers a first-person perspective of the residential school system in Canada, as it shares the memories of more than 70 survivors from across Canada, as well as 125 archival and contemporary images (65 black & white photographs, 51 colour, some never before published).

The detailed, full colour map showing residential schools, timeline with key dates, glossary, and a helpful index (including names of survivors and schools) make this vital resource a must-have for students at both a secondary and post-secondary level, libraries, and the general reader looking for more information about Residential Schools.

Residential School: A Children’s History is recommended for secondary and post secondary reading levels

$35

 

All of these Gift Ideas support the Save the Evidence Campaign directly and can be purchased at our Front Desk or also online!

Visit our Online Store Here

Posted by & filed under Events, Exhibits, Uncategorised.

This exhibition is an acknowledgement and honouring of cornhusk, one of the most important and ancient materials used by the Haudenosaunne.

Exhibiting artwork made from corn husk as well as sharing the versatility of the corn plant.

“Cornhusk protects.  It has protected the integrity of the corn seed on each cob, on every stalk in every field, every year, for too many years to count.  Corn is still gathered, and the husk is still braided for storing the same way that it has been for several years over many generations.  The husk that has and continues to protect the integrity of each kernel of corn is now used to protect the stories.”  – Elizabeth Doxtater

Elizabeth Doxtater is one of the featured artists in this Exhibit alongside Frazer Sundown.

Born and raised on the Six Nations /Grand River Territory Elizabeth is a multi-media artist who explores and celebrates our history & stories through many mediums.  She paints, does beadwork, and works with cornhusk.

For Elizabeth, working with cornhusk is like reaching back in time and working with the same material that our ancient ancestors worked with.  

Elizabeth is the author of the books Dreamfast (2018) and Art of Peace (2016.)  Most recently Elizabeth was commissioned by the Ontario College of Teachers to represent the four ethical standards of the teaching practice: Care, Integrity, Respect and Trust.  Elizabeth and her family run a small gallery and shop in Ohsweken, called Everything Cornhusk

We are grateful that Elizabeth is keeping this art form alive to pass on to the next generations. Frazer Sundown acknolwedges Elizabeth as one of his inspirations in his own journey.

“I’m just honoured to be a part of something that celebrates our stories in a really traditional manner. My understanding is that cornhusk is a protector, since the time of creation it’s protected every kernel on every corn field, since that time and it continues to do that. What I try to do, is use that cornhusk to try and protect the stories,” – Elizabeth Doxtater

Frazer Sundown comes from the Oneida Nation of the Turtle Clan and has been working and creating with corn husk for over a decade.  He started by braiding corn husks for ceremonial purposes as a helper for the people of his communities. Frazer was first taught by his father, Sheldon Sundown, who taught him the technique of weaving.

He was taught how to twine corn husk by Jamie Jacobs of the Tonawanda Reservation. This is the community where Frazer grew up and gained a vast amount of knowledge of culture including singing. Today Frazer resides in London, Ontario, where he creates many objects and artworks made of corn husk. 

“Corn husk is something that is natural and comes from the earth. It becomes medicinal when working with corn husk and brings a sense of peace when working with it. Working with corn husk also brings people together where language, culture, and history is passed on orally. That being said, working with corn husk is not only a revitalization of weaving, however it brings our culture alive in its truest form.” – Frazer Sundown

This exhibition will be on display in the Tom Hill and Judy Harris galleries of the Woodland Cultural Centre from December 7.2019 – February 15 2020.

All support community members receive FREE admission to the museum including: Six Nations of the Grand River, Tyendinaga & Wahta

Throughout the exhibit you will see many stories shared through the Art of Cornhusk. The Creation story and the Peacemaker’s Journey are two stunning dioramas created by Doxtater. These are two very significant stories that have been told for many many years. We invite all educators, students, and community members out to learn these stories through such a beautiful art form.

We hope to see the surrounding communities out to share the history from the Hands of our Ancestors, and experience the stories held within this beautiful art work.

 

Exhibit Dates:

Dec 7 – Feb 15th

184 Mohawk St, Brantford ON

Posted by & filed under Events, News, Save the Evidence.

Every Single Brick Has a Story.

The picture on the left is Geronimo Henry’s brick. Geronimo is a Survivor who attended the Mohawk Institute from the age of 5 to 16 and will be this month’s speaker at the Survivor Series Monday December 16 at 10am (more details on our events calendar).
He has spoke at over 100 schools about his experiences in Residential Schools, to allow everyone to truly understand the trauma the Indigenous children experienced for over 150 years.
A few days ago, he took one of our staff on a Brick Tour around the former Mohawk Institute and shared stories from the bricks. He managed to find a few of his friends’ names.
“A lot of the names on these bricks have passed away now, but it’s like they are still here” Geronimo said as he put his hand on the brick.
The masonry work to preserve the original bricks, where so many Survivors have left their names and numbers and messages, will require approximately 400,000 bricks be restored at around $5 a Brick.
This year on #GivingTuesdayCA, which is a global movement to “Do Good” following Black Friday and Cyber Monday… we are asking for your support.
The Save the Evidence Team has set a goal to save 1000 Bricks, in one day, and kick the Season of Giving the right way.

*** LISTEN TO THIS: An anonymous donor has agreed to match all donations made on Tuesday December 3, 2019 which is #GivingTuesdayCA for up to $5000 ***

 

We thank you for your support in this very important project. 

Click Here to Donate Now

With Gratitude, 

The Woodland Cultural Centre Team

184 Mohawk St, Brantford ON
519-759-2650

Posted by & filed under News, Save the Evidence, Uncategorised.

Why Not Gift a Brick this year to everyone on your Holiday list and support the Save the Evidence Campaign?

The $5 Gift that keeps on Giving. This year at Woodland Cultural Centre, you can support the Save the Evidence Campaign by making a $5 Donation to “Gift a Brick” to a friend or family member. When you make a $5 Donation you will receive a replica cardboard brick from the former Mohawk Institute Residential School and your contribution will go towards the Save the Evidence Campaign.

This year on #GivingTuesdayCA December 3rd, 2019 we have set a goal to save 1000 bricks!

What is the Save the Evidence Campaign?

As one of only a handful of residential school buildings left still standing in Canada, the Mohawk Institute Indian Residential School is a physical reminder of the legacy of assimilation imposed upon First Nations children in Canada. More than 15,000 people visit the Mohawk Institute, as part of the Woodland Cultural Centre, every year. Visitors come to see not only what was once the longest-running residential school in Canada, but to experience the stories the building holds.

In 2013, major roof leaks caused significant and costly damage to the building. With such large costs to repair the building, the Woodland Cultural Centre conducted several Community Consultations to gauge the level of support from the community. The results were overwhelming, with more than 98% in support of the restoration of the Mohawk Institute.

The Save The Evidence fundraising campaign was launched in response. Its goal is to raise the necessary funds for repairs and renovations to ensure the physical evidence of the dark history of Residential Schools in Canada is never forgotten.

400,000 Bricks of the old Masonry needs replacing, and we want you to be a part of hitting this goal.

Some classrooms and local businesses are jumping on board with the “Gift a Brick” campaign and have goals to fill the walls of their hallways with bricks that their students have saved. We are looking for other organizations, schools, and groups to jump on board. If we work together as a community, that 400,000 brick goal can be achieved in no time!

How amazing would it be to see Brick Walls like this one popping up all over the country?

Thank you to everyone who has already supported the Save the Evidence campaign, this project wouldn’t be possible without your contributions. Now is a chance to give a little piece of this history to others!

3 Ways You Can Help

  1.  Make a personal donation on #GivingTuesdayCA (Dec 3) at the Museum or online and Save as many Bricks as you can! Donate Online
  2.  Help us by encouraging your staff, students, and customers to “Gift a Brick” at your locations and raise a Brick Wall for the campaign Download the Fundraising Letter Here
  3.  Make a PLEDGE to “Do Good” on #GivingTuesdayCA (Dec 3) in the name of WCC and we are entered to win an extra $5000 towards the project.  Make Your Pledge Here

*Please Note: All Donations made on #GivingTuesdayCA (Dec 3) will be matched Brick for Brick by an Anonymous donor!

 

Interested in supporting the “Gift a Brick” campaign?

Download the Gift a Brick Fundraising Letter Here.

 

** SPECIAL UPDATE **

An anonymous donor has agreed to MATCH all of the donations we get on #GivingTuesdayCA (December 3rd) up to $5000 

Let’s make a big splash and kick off the Season of Giving the right way!

Also, even just by officially PLEDGING to #dogoodstuff on December 3rd, in the name of Woodland Cultural Centre, we get entered to win $5000 towards the project! Thats 1000 more bricks.

Tell CanadaHelps how you plan on celebrating. Are you volunteering, donating, fundraising, or spreading the word? Make a pledge today! https://bit.ly/34d1ehp

*** No Monetary Donation Required! ***

Each Pledge gives us a chance to win $5000! So share with your friends!

PLEDGE HERE IN THE NAME OF WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE NOW

 

Gift a Brick at any of the following locations:

 

  • Woodland Cultural Centre
  • Good Friend’s Sandwich Company
  • Oakhill Marketplace
  • Six Nations Tourism
  • Iroquois Ridge Highschool
  • Life Sustainers

 


 

 

More Gifts under $40 that support the “Save the Evidence” Campaign

 

Why not give a gift that has a deeper meaning and impact? All of the proceeds from our Online Store go towards the Save the Evidence Campaign. We have something for everyone, young and old. Knowing that your gift is going to help to preserve an important part of history, make both the Giver and the Receiver feel good about their presents!

Save the Evidence T-Shirts (Black or White)

One of our favourite items this year is our Save the Evidence Shirts with the Mohawk Institute Building on the front. These shirts now are available in white and black, and are a great way to spread awareness about the significance of the project!

These shirts make the perfect gift for teachers, coworkers, friends and family.

Currently only available in adult sizes

$25

 


Fatty Legs: A True Story

This book is an interesting story of an Inuit girl who wanted to learn to read. This book has been wildly honoured in the Childrens’ book world. It documents her experience at a Residential School and shares the true story of what many Indigenous children experienced during that time. Fatty Legs made the Globe and Mail’s Ten Best Children’s Books of the Year in 2010 and was named a finalist for the Sheila A. Egoff Children’s Literature Prize, part of the BC Book Prize awards. 

This book is a grade 4+ reading level.

A great gift idea for someone younger, or even a teacher who teaches at that Grade level for their classroom.

$22

 

A Stranger at Home: Sequel to the Powerful Memoir Fatty Legs

The sequel to the award-winning Fatty Legs, A Stranger at Home continues the story of Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, who again works with her daughter-in-law, Christy Jordon-Fenton, to tell her tale. This part of the story tells about the young girl’s return home and the struggles of going back to her family and community after her experience at the Residential School. Her own mother does not recognize her.

A Stranger at Home book is a grade 4+ reading level.

The perfect combination with Fatty Legs.

$22

 


When We Were Alone

Winner of the Governor General’s Literacy Award as well as a finalist for the TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award, When We Were Young is a celebrated children’s book. An important conversation to have with children, this 24 page picture book tells the story of a young girl learning about her grandmother’s experiences at Residential School.

This gentle and honest means of learning is the perfect way to highlight the importance and resilience of family relationships.

When We Were Alone is suitable for youth from Kindergarten to Gr.3.

This is a great book for younger classrooms or as a gift for a teacher

$20


Residential School: A Children’s History

Residential Schools: With the Words and Images of Survivors, A National History EPUB honours the Survivors of residential schools.  A finalist for the Norma Fleck award, this book offers a first-person perspective of the residential school system in Canada, as it shares the memories of more than 70 survivors from across Canada, as well as 125 archival and contemporary images (65 black & white photographs, 51 colour, some never before published). The detailed, full colour map showing residential schools, timeline with key dates, glossary, and a helpful index (including names of survivors and schools) make this vital resource a must-have for students at both a secondary and post-secondary level, libraries, and the general reader looking for more information about Residential Schools.

Residential School: A Children’s History is recommended for secondary and post secondary reading levels

$35

 

All of these Gift Ideas support the Save the Evidence Campaign directly and can be purchased at our Front Desk or also online!

Visit our Online Store Here

 

For more information on Fundraising Contact:

Carley Gallant-Jenkins

Save the Evidence Coordinator

ste@woodlandculturalcentre.ca

Posted by & filed under News, Save the Evidence, Uncategorised.

Mentor College Students presented the funds they raised through Orange Shirt Day sales to the Save the Evidence Campaign during a special talk from Eddy Robinson.

Eddy Robinson spoke to Mentor College staff and student body and his personal round table discussion was powerful and impactful for the Grade 12 History and Philosophy students.

Eddy was born and raised in Toronto, the largest city in Canada, and grew up in poverty. It was not until his adult years that he really begun to understand the legacy of his father’s experience at the Chapleau Indian Residential School and Shingwauk Indian Residential School.

Eddie Robinson was recently the keynote speaker here at Woodland Cultural Centre for our Survivors Gathering 2019.

Eddy has worked and advocated for many Indigenous communities locally, provincially and nationally for the past 25 years. The Dewegun (D-Way-Gun which means Drum) first set him on a path in life leading to many other important sources that contributed to the rediscovery of his Anishinaabe and Muskegowuk Cree identity. On his journey he had the privilege of experiencing Traditional ceremonies, Indigenous literature & film, mentoring by Cultural leaders, Traditional Teachers and Elders.

Since then Eddy has traveled throughout North America as a noted Indigenous artist, teacher, musician, educator, facilitator, trainer, writer, consultant and now speaker. He has presented to numerous First Nations, Indigenous communities, local district school boards, colleges, universities, corporate institutions as well as several Indigenous and non-Indigenous non-profit organizations.

In order to heal from the impacts of colonial trauma and oppression. We need to elevate the collective consciousness globally about what truthfully happened here to Indigenous People in Canada and North America. The truth will not only help many Indigenous and non-Indigenous people grow; It will continue to help and support the healing process. – Eddy Robinson

Learn more about Eddy Robinson and watch his TedxTalk on his Website.

Eddy shared a very special and meaningful talk with the students and staff of Mentor College. Through a round table discussion with Grade 12 students taking philosophy and history, Eddy was able to reach these students on a personal level.  Save the Evidence Coordinator, Carley Gallant-Jenkins, was invited to speak and share in the round table discussion.

In conjunction with Eddy’s visit, Mentor College students presented the Save The Evidence Campaign with the funds they raised from selling Orange T-shirts.

Carley Gallant-Jenkins (left) accepted the donation to the Save the Evidence Campaign and gave special acknowledgement to Darina Al Around (center) and Melika Sadeghi (right) two Grade 12 philosophy students who spearheaded the Orange T-Shirt sales.

Would you like to learn more about fundraising for the Save the Evidence campaign?

Read about the Save the Evidence Campaign Here

Everyone here at Woodland Cultural Centre is proud of these young adults who are doing their part in spreading the awareness about Residential Schools, and contribute to Saving the Evidence.

 

The countdown to #GivingTuesday is winding down. There is still time to organize your fundraiser and make a contribution to a worthwhile non-profit or charity. Read more about #GivingTuesday and how you can help here. 

 

If you want to help, want some fundraising ideas and assistance from the team reach out to:

Carley Gallant-Jenkins
Save the Evidence Coordinator
ste@woodlandculturalcentre.ca
519 759 2650 ext 230

Ask about our “Gift a Brick” Fundraising Initiative to restore the masonry work in the former Mohawk Institute Residential School.

Posted by & filed under News, Save the Evidence.

John Elliot, went to the Mohawk Institute from 1947-1952.

In the Virtual Tour of the former building, when asked why it’s important to Save the Evidence he says “Everybody has a plaque, but not everybody has a building.”

John was initially sent there for truancy, and he jokes that he still hasn’t found out what truancy means. When he arrived at the school he was at a Grade 3 level, and when he left 5 years later he was only in Grade 5.

John was known as the “Runner”.

Every year on Christmas he would run away, no matter if he was punished or put into solitary confinement. When asked what was the hardest part of it all he said, “Late at night, everything would be quiet, and I would hear the train. That whistle would make me feel so lonesome. So I’d just get up, and I’d be gone. Didn’t know where I was going, just gone.”

Recently John Elliot attended Santee Smith’s performance of The Mush Hole, and he was asked to go on stage. When the students in the audience recognized him, they came up to speak with him after. John shared how good it felt to know that they had listened and remembered him.

It was only recently John started telling his story and was surprised at how many people didn’t know anything about Residential Schools. “I thought everyone knew,” said John.

“Everybody has a plaque, but not everybody has a building.” – John Elliot

With growing awareness of this dark part of Canada’s history, John is glad that people finally want to know about it, and he encourages everyone to support the Campaign. “If you walk through the building you can feel it. I’ve never felt anything from a plaque. We have to save the building.”

This story was featured in our November Edition of the Save the Evidence Newsletter.

To subscribe to our Online Newsletter fill out your Email Below!

Read the Full Newsletter Online Now CLICK HERE

Posted by & filed under Events, News, Uncategorised.

The Corn Soup Cook-Off is always a favourite of the Community, and every year we declare the #1 Voted Best Corn Soup Recipe from the community! This year we wanted to up the stakes, and encourage some new Soup Cookers to come out and compete.

We need YOU, the community, to come out and be the official judges of this event.

Admission: $10

Includes:

  • One official Voting Ballot
  • More Corn Soup than you can eat!
  • Keep your Mug/Bowl and take it home with you.

This year our First Place Winner of the Corn Soup Cook-Off will take home $500 and be recognized as the #1 Voted BEST Corn Soup Recipe!

 

 

Cash Prizes

1st – $500

2nd – $200

3rd – $100

 

And every Soup Cooker who enters their soup on Battle Day will be entered to win our Prize Raffle.


 

Want details on how to register? Deadline is Nov 13th

Call Tara at 519-759-2650 Ext 223

All are welcome to register!

On Nov 16th the Community will VOTE on the Best Corn Soup Recipe.

 

Know someone with the best corn soup???

Join our Facebook Event here so you don’t miss any of the updates or the announcement of this year’s winner!

Posted by & filed under Employment, News.

Cultural Interpreter

Contract Job Posting

 

The Woodland Cultural Centre is an Indigenous educational and cultural centre.  It was established in 1972 to protect, promote, interpret, and present the history, language, intellect and cultural heritage of the Anishinaabek and Onkwehon:we.  This mandate is from our member Nations: Wahta Mohawks, Six Nations of the Grand River and the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte.

 

The Woodland Cultural Centre demonstrates the highest standards of excellence in the practice, presentation, interpretation and collection of resources in Education; Museology; Arts; Language and Cultural Heritage in order to foster an appreciation of the intellect and promote an accurate image of Indigenous people. 

 

Job Summary

Under the direction of the Educational Coordinator the Cultural Interpreter will assume responsibility for leading guided tours of the Woodland Cultural Centre’s Museum and the Mohawk Institute Residential School. They will present workshops, educational programs, to K – 12 school groups, summer camps, community organizations and individuals.  In addition to conducting research related to educational programming. Using object-based learning, inquiry-based learning to explore Indigenous art, history, culture and residential schools. 

 

Duties and Responsibilities

 

  • The Cultural Interpreter will lead guided tours of the Woodland Cultural Centre and the Mohawk Institute Residential School. 
  • Present Interpretive programs, activities, workshops and other cultural events that will promote an understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture. 
  • Demonstrate the highest standards of excellence in the practice, presentation, interpretation.
  • Will be responsible for preparing supplies for workshops, educational programs; Inventorying, resupply of education kits as needed.
  • Maintaining a clean, safe, environment
  • Contributes to improving the Centre’s cultural resources and educational projects, procedures with practical ideas, creativity and innovation.   
  • Must be dependable and exercise good judgement
  • Comply with all WCC’s policies and procedures.

 

 

Qualifications

  • Ability to coordinate, control and organize multiple functions and activities.
  • Strong communication, interpersonal and problem-solving abilities.
  • Time management skills, the ability to establish priorities, meet deadlines efficiently and within stated timelines. 
  • To work independently and as part of a team, to accomplish the organization’s goals and objectives. 
  • Must have a pleasant, courteous, professional manner and interact positively with others. 
  • The ability to communicate clearly, effectively both verbally and in writing in order to collect, exchange, provide information in an accurate and timely manner. 
  • The ability to sit, stand and or walk for extended periods of time.

 

Education

  • Certification, diploma and/or degree in Museum Studies, Museum Education, Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Art History and/or related fields of study.
  • Have an understanding/knowledge of Indigenous/Haudensaunee culture. 
  • One to three years experience in a museum and/or educational setting. 

 

Experience

  • An understanding of the functions of a museum, its methodologies and practices.
  • Experience in the field of Interpretive theory; techniques such as object-based learning, inquiry-based learning, storytelling, demonstration and guided tours.
  • Knowledge of contemporary Indigenous art, history, culture and Residential schools.
  • Knowledge of Indigenous language is an asset; not a requirement. 

The Cultural Interpreter’s regular hours are from 9:00am-4:30pm, Tuesday to Friday.

 

All applicants for this position should submit a cover letter, a current resume, and three references by 4:00pm November 15th, 2019

 

If interested, please send to: 

Woodland Cultural Centre

184 Mohawk Street, Brantford, ON N3S 2X2

Attn: Elizabeth Adams, Education Coordinator

education@woodlandculturalcentre.ca

 

NOTE: Preference will be given to Indigenous applicants and only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

 

** Download the full Job Details Here**

Posted by & filed under Employment.

Join our team!

Language Manager

The Woodland Cultural Centre’s Language Department has worked for 35 years to preserve, promote, and document Ǫgwehǫ:weh languages. The Language Manager takes a leadership role in ensuring that the Language Department continues to meet the needs of the community. Under the direction of the Executive Director, the Language Manager assumes the responsibilities for the development of strategic partnerships and initiatives related to the documentation, research, stabilization, and promotion of Ǫgwehǫ:weh languages. The Language Manager is responsible for working with community and language stakeholders to develop project objectives, investigating funding sources for language-based initiatives, and oversee the day-to-day operations of the Language Resource Centre.

REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
• An in-depth knowledge of Longhouse Protocols, Speeches, and Haudenosaunee cultural practices, including Ganǫhǫnyǫhk, Gei: Niyoihwa:ge:, and Gaihwi:yo.
• Familiarity with community language initiatives, and the ability to develop respectful partnerships with language stakeholders in the community.
• Be orally proficient and literate in at least one Ǫgwehǫ:weh language, as the collection is centred around oral recordings in the Cayuga and Onondaga languages.
• Have a basic knowledge of language learning methodologies and linguistics.
• Use a community-centred approach for networking with language educators and advocates.
• Experience in language leadership, teaching, and program development.
• Ability to develop and implement community collaborations.
• The ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing.
• Strong interpersonal and leadership skills.
• Experience in project management and report writing are considered assets.

 

DOWNLOAD FULL JOB DESCRIPTION HERE

All applicants for this position should submit a current CV or Resume, a sample of writing in an Ǫgwehǫ:weh Language on the topic of their choice, and three references. References must include one reference who can attest to applicant’s level of proficiency and literacy in an Ǫgwehǫ:weh Language, one employment reference, and one personal or community reference.

Preference will be given to applicants of Ǫgwehǫ:weh heritage who are proficient in the languages of Cayuga or Onondaga.

 

Please send cover letter and resumé with references by 4 pm on Wednesday, November 20, 2019, to:

Attn: Executive Director
Woodland Cultural Centre
184 Mohawk Street
Brantford, ON N3S 2X2
executive@woodlandculturalcentre.ca
(519) 759-2650

 

Note: Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

 

Posted by & filed under Employment.

Join our team!

Administrative Assistant

The Woodland Cultural Centre is currently seeking an Administrative Assistant. Under the direction of the Executive Director and the Manager of Operations, the Administrative Assistant assumes the responsibilities for administrative duties including but not limited to: coordination and scheduling of meetings for Executive office, organization and filing of documents and records, maintaining up-to-date department statistics, reports, and records, taking meeting minutes, proofreading and copyediting, aiding with preparation of submissions to funding bodies, assisting with Board meeting preparation including printing and copying, and other general admin duties.

 

Qualifications
• Highly organized with exceptional attention to detail
• Strong communication skills both verbal and written
• Proficient in Microsoft Office Programs
• Ability to multitask, set priorities and meet tight deadlines
• Time management skills, and completion of assigned projects
• Possess knowledge and understanding of Indigenous people, their culture, history and traditions, especially in Ontario
• Possess a knowledge of the Woodland Cultural Centre’s mandate, programs, services and resources
• Confidentiality is mandatory in this position

 

DOWNLOAD FULL JOB DESCRIPTION HERE

The Administrative Assistant’s regular hours are from 9-4:30, Monday to Friday.

All applicants for this position should submit a cover letter, a current resume, and three references by 4 pm November 15th, 2019.

NOTE: The successful applicant must qualify and be approved for Training on the Job funding through Grand River Employment and Training (GREAT) in order to receive an offer of employment.

If interested, please send cover letter and resumé with references by 4 pm November 15th, 2019 to:

Woodland Cultural Centre
184 Mohawk Street
Brantford, ON N3S 2X2

Attn: Andrea Nechita
Manager of Operations
(519) 759-2650
operations@woodlandculturalcentre.ca

Note: Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.